How to Fix Consequences of the Last Apple Update

Daryl, DevMate Octopus
by Daryl, DevMate Octopus on
As you may already know, yesterday Apple has released a new Security Update to the OS X 10.11 that caused a serious issue: it disabled Ethernet port on the Mac OS X. That was reported by a lot of consumers and posted on the Internet, at MacRumors for instance. The main trouble here is that the update was silent

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Pure profit, no charges. DevMate platform is free for everybody.

Daryl, DevMate Octopus
by Daryl, DevMate Octopus on
This day is going down in history as a holiday for developers. From now on, you can host and sell your OS X apps and don’t pay for it: DevMate platform is available for free. It’s not a time-limited or user-limited trial. It’s all yours for as long as you want it. We give developers complete freedom

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Sparkle Vulnerability: Who’s in Danger and What to Do

Daryl, DevMate Octopus
by Daryl, DevMate Octopus on
We’ve been mildly avalanched with our customers’ questions about the recent Sparkle vulnerability issue. Before we get any deeper into the subject, we’d like to assure all DevMate users — you are completely safe. DevMate meets all ATS requirements and is fully protected from man-in-the-middle attacks. Now, to the trouble itself. As a security researcher Radek discovered in late

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Sell apps outside the Mac App Store: It’s probably down anyway.

Daryl, DevMate Octopus
by Daryl, DevMate Octopus on
I had a bad feeling last night, deep in my gut. And it totally wasn’t the taco-salad from the new place on the corner with the B cleanliness rating. In the morning, I discovered it was far, far worse: the Mac App Store had been down. Chaos, panic, anarchy. Developers counted their losses today, weeping in unison with frustrated

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Nobody wants to read your update dialog

Daryl, DevMate Octopus
by Daryl, DevMate Octopus on
One of our customers calls their users to remind them about updating an app. They call their users. On the telephone. They feel forced to do so because their update adoption rates are just above zero. No adoption rates means massive profit losses and months of wasted work. It may sound as if users are simply indifferent to improvements, but

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