How direct distribution makes customer maintenance so much better

by Christian Tietze on

 

This blog post is bought to you by Christian Tietze, who writes books on coding practices. And created and

Distribution via the Mac App Store is truly limiting. Imagine you shipped an update with a bug. What happens?
First, how'll you discover the bug? Of course you could discover the bug on your own. Or a friend who's using the app tells you about it. Or a loyal Twitter follower. The expectation is that most customers will not get in touch with you, though. Instead, they'll leave bad reviews in the store -- if they take any action at all. Not very satisfying.

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How to convert Mac App's trial users to paid customers using email

by Yaroslav Stepanenko on

You know your Mac App is great and users love it. You set your key marketing goal on getting the right people to try it out. If the audience is well-selected, conversion shouldn’t be a problem. Because when you like an app, you buy it, right? Not exactly. Actually, 85% of users drift away after signing up for a free trial. And it has little to do with your Mac App.

Converting trial users to paid customers takes more than a good app. It takes a well-balanced combo of emails, remarketing, in-app communication campaigns, cross-sell/upsell campaigns, and quite a few other efforts.

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OS X Analytics Mobile App for iPhone is Here

by Yaroslav Stepanenko on

We know our users are all passionate techies more than it’s statistically possible. We know how often they check on their mac app analytics and how disconnected they feel when away from their computers.

That’s why we’ve created the missing link — DevMate mobile app.

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A Simple A/B Split Test to Boost Your Mac App Revenue

by Yaroslav Stepanenko on

Some conversion optimization campaigns are complicated, while others are simple and produce immediate results. As an example of the latter, see how we switched two different CTAs on our Mac applications’ activation dialogue, and ran an A/B split test. Yes, we have done only one simple change: we switched two CTAs, and it resulted in a tremendous boost in conversion, and translated into thousands of dollars in monthly app revenue.

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How to Fix Consequences of the Last Apple Update

by Daryl, The DevMate Octopus on

As you may already know, yesterday Apple has released a new Security Update to the OS X 10.11 that caused a serious issue: it disabled Ethernet port on the Mac OS X. That was reported by a lot of consumers and posted on the Internet, at MacRumors for instance.

The main trouble here is that the update was silent and affected lots of computers worldwide, especially iMacs and MacBooks Pro.

Due to some DevMate activation system nuances, this failure may cause your application to lose its license.

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Pure profit, no charges. DevMate platform is free for everybody.

by Daryl, The DevMate Octopus on

This day is going down in history as a holiday for developers. From now on, you can host and sell your OS X apps and don’t pay for it: DevMate platform is available for free. It’s not a time-limited or user-limited trial. It’s all yours for as long as you want it.

We give developers complete freedom and provide everything you need to grow your business. Focus on what you do best — coding; leave licensing, feedback, payment and the rest to us. We’ll take care of it, and we’ll do it for free. Just because we like you.

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Sparkle Vulnerability: Who’s in Danger and What to Do

by Daryl, The DevMate Octopus on

We’ve been mildly avalanched with our customers’ questions about the recent Sparkle vulnerability issue. Before we get any deeper into the subject, we’d like to assure all DevMate users — you are completely safe. DevMate meets all ATS requirements and is fully protected from man-in-the-middle attacks.

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Sell apps outside the Mac App Store: It’s probably down anyway.

by Daryl, The DevMate Octopus on

 I had a bad feeling last night, deep in my gut. And it totally wasn’t the taco-salad from the new place on the corner with the B cleanliness rating. In the morning, I discovered it was far, far worse: the Mac App Store had been down. Chaos, panic, anarchy. Developers counted their losses today, weeping in unison with frustrated customers who couldn’t open their favorite games.

All that misery for an insulting amount of money that Mac App Store charges for the possibility to place your apps on their shelves. Selling via the MAS means losing 30% of profits, which is ridiculously costly, especially if you’re a small developer.

Simple math: you sell your app for $10 to 50 people. That’s $500 going into your pocket if you sell outside the Empire that is the Mac App Store. In the unfortunate case that you did choose the MAS as your primary channel, that’s $150 less. Oh, and another $100 yearly fee for just being there. So that makes it $250. A half. Add in the absence of paid updates and please hold back your tears.

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Nobody wants to read your update dialog.

by Daryl, The DevMate Octopus on

One of our customers calls their users to remind them about updating an app. They call their users. On the telephone. They feel forced to do so because their update adoption rates are just above zero. No adoption rates means massive profit losses and months of wasted work.

It may sound as if users are simply indifferent to improvements, but that’s not it. It’s not the updates users don’t want, it’s the process of updating. I love driving on a smooth, new highway, but that doesn’t mean I have the patience for the construction it takes to make one. I want a new highway without an “Under Construction” sign, if you’d please.

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App development secrets from DevMate experts

by Daryl, The DevMate Octopus on

From today, this blog is taking a full turnaround. DevMate has an expert OS X team on board, willing to share what they know about developing and selling mac apps.

We decided to make our knowledge available to anyone interested. We’re not launching a full-scale academy, but we all know that knowledge and experience are invaluable for the world of mac app development.

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